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United States Department of Transportation United States Department of Transportation

U.S. Airport Runway Pavement Conditions

Dataset Table:

Year NPIAS(a) airports, number Good condition (percent) Fair condition (percent) Poor condition (percent) 1
1986 3,243 61 28 11 2
1990 3,285 61 29 10 3
1993 3,294 68 25 7 4
1997 3,331 72 23 5 5

Embedded Dataset Excel:

Dataset Excel:

table_01_25_061020.xlsx

Notes:

Data are as of January 1 of each year. Runway pavement condition is classified by the FAA as follows:

Good: All cracks and joints are sealed.

Fair: Mild surface cracking, unsealed joints, and slab edge spalling.

Poor: Large open cracks, surface and edge spalling, vegetation growing through cracks and joints. 

Description:

KEY: NPIAS = National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems.

a The U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems is composed of all commercial service airports, all reliever airports, and selected general aviation airports. It does not include over 1,000 publicly owned public-use landing areas, privately owned public-use airports, and other civil landing areas not open to the general public. NPIAS airports account for almost all enplanements. In 2005, there were approximately 16,500 non-NPIAS airports. See table 1-3 for more detail on airports. 

b Commercial service airports are defined as public airports receiving scheduled passenger service, and having at least 2,500 enplaned passengers per year. 

Source:

Condition:

1986, 1990:  U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (Washington DC: 1991).

1993:  Ibid., National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (Washington DC: 1995). 

1997, 1999-2018:  U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Airport Planning and Programming, National Planning Division, personal communication, Dec. 22, 2009, Dec. 7, 2010,  Dec. 22, 2011, Aug. 22, 2013, Sept. 1, 2014, Oct. 25, 2016, Jul. 9, 2018, May 17, 2019, and Jun. 4, 2020.

Total number of airports:

Ibid., personal communications, Dec. 22, 2009, Dec. 7, 2010, Dec. 22, 2011, Aug. 22, 2013, Sept. 1, 2014, Oct. 25, 2016, Aug. 31, 2017, May 17, 2019, and Jun. 4, 2020

Publications: